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Postpartum Depression VS Baby Blues


Commonly referred to as PPD, postpartum depression is a mood disorder that some mothers experience. While society often interchanges the term postpartum depression with baby blues, there is a vast difference between the two.



 Commonly referred to as PPD, postpartum depression is a mood disorder that some mothers experience. While society often interchanges the term postpartum depression with baby blues, there is a vast difference between the two.      Baby Blues 	There is a significant hormone fluctuation that women experience after giving birth. The rapid change in hormones can lead to bouts of sadness, hopelessness, mood swings, and crying fits. If these symptoms are mild and are not prolonged, then their condition is likely baby blues. While these symptoms can be alarming for mothers and affect the entire family, they are a normal response to giving birth and the body needing time to re-calibrate. If mood swings become extreme or are coupled with extended periods of depression, the mother may be experiencing postpartum depression.   Postpartum Depression 	Postpartum Depression is a condition that manifests itself in many forms such as sleep disorders, loss of appetite, difficulty concentrating, low self-esteem and maye even involve  suicidal thoughts. A study conducted in 2018 and published in the Annals of General Psychiatry showed that postpartum depression may also affect socialization behaviors in children and the mother. Socialization behaviors affected by postpartum depression further lead to thoughts of failure leading to deeper depression. Postpartum depression is a mental illness that can take a toll on the health of an entire family. What options do mothers have for PPD treatment?  Mental Health Treatment for Postpartum Depression 	Adequate support is essential in the treatment of postpartum depression. Exercise, nutrition, sleep, familial and professional support, mindfulness, and access to resources that will offer support in her motherhood journey are all important foundations during postpartum. Aspen Ketamine Center is a full-circle functional wellness center with a number of life-enhancing treatment options for women who are experiencing postpartum depression. There is nutrition counseling, IV hydration, meditation sessions, and ketamine infusion therapy among other treatment options available at Aspen Ketamine Center.  Did you know that a single ketamine infusion after birth may be enough to prevent postpartum depression? Ketamine works by regrowing neural pathways in the brain and giving women the opportunity to feel like themselves again.  PPD Risk Factors 	While all pregnant women are at risk of experiencing postpartum depression, there is a higher chance of experiencing it if you previously experienced depression or if someone in your family has. Many scientific studies have shown that depression during pregnancy is a powerful factor in predicting postpartum depression as well. PPD can affect all women regardless of age, race, ethnicity, or economic status. Increased risk factors for postpartum depression do exist. The following experiences may contribute to thoughts of hopelessness or inability to mother: a strenuous labor/birthing experience, inability to breastfeed after hoping to do so, and social isolation.  Ketamine and Breastfeeding 	It's important to note that there are few studies on the effect of ketamine and breastmilk, however, ​​a recently published study The Pharmacokinetics of Ketamine in the Breast Milk of Lactating Women: Quantification of ketamine and metabolites is the first study conducted on this subject providing data that supports the safety of ketamine administration for the treatment of postpartum depression (PPD) and other emotional disorders during breastfeeding. Women seeking ketamine therapy during the postpartum period will want to have a thorough conversation with their doctor, ketamine provider, and integration therapist to make sure ketamine infusions are right for them. At Aspen Ketamine Center, we recommend waiting a minimum of 12 hours after treatment to resume breastfeeding.   Aspen Ketamine Center also recommends optional private genetic testing specific to psychedelics to help the client and provider guide them on how they may respond to treatment based on their genetic markers. To learn more about genetic testing for psychedelic therapies, discover more here.


Baby Blues

There is a significant hormone fluctuation that women experience after giving birth. The rapid change in hormones can lead to bouts of sadness, hopelessness, mood swings, and crying fits. If these symptoms are mild and are not prolonged, then their condition is likely baby blues. While these symptoms can be alarming for mothers and affect the entire family, they are a normal response to giving birth and the body needing time to re-calibrate. If mood swings become extreme or are coupled with extended periods of depression, the mother may be experiencing postpartum depression.


Postpartum Depression

Postpartum Depression is a condition that manifests itself in many forms such as sleep disorders, loss of appetite, difficulty concentrating, low self-esteem and maye even involve suicidal thoughts. A study conducted in 2018 and published in the Annals of General Psychiatry showed that postpartum depression may also affect socialization behaviors in children and the mother. Socialization behaviors affected by postpartum depression further lead to thoughts of failure leading to deeper depression. Postpartum depression is a mental illness that can take a toll on the health of an entire family. What options do mothers have for PPD treatment?


Mental Health Treatment for Postpartum Depression

Adequate support is essential in the treatment of postpartum depression. Exercise, nutrition, sleep, familial and professional support, mindfulness, and access to resources that will offer support in her motherhood journey are all important foundations during postpartum. Aspen Ketamine Center is a full-circle functional wellness center with a number of life-enhancing treatment options for women who are experiencing postpartum depression. There is nutrition counseling, IV hydration, meditation sessions, and ketamine infusion therapy among other treatment options available at Aspen Ketamine Center. Did you know that a single ketamine infusion after birth may be enough to prevent postpartum depression? Ketamine works by regrowing neural pathways in the brain and giving women the opportunity to feel like themselves again.


PPD Risk Factors

While all pregnant women are at risk of experiencing postpartum depression, there is a higher chance of experiencing it if you previously experienced depression or if someone in your family has. Many scientific studies have shown that depression during pregnancy is a powerful factor in predicting postpartum depression as well. PPD can affect all women regardless of age, race, ethnicity, or economic status. Increased risk factors for postpartum depression do exist. The following experiences may contribute to thoughts of hopelessness or inability to mother: a strenuous labor/birthing experience, inability to breastfeed after hoping to do so, and social isolation.


Ketamine and Breastfeeding

It's important to note that there are few studies on the effect of ketamine and breastmilk, however, ​​a recently published study The Pharmacokinetics of Ketamine in the Breast Milk of Lactating Women: Quantification of ketamine and metabolites is the first study conducted on this subject providing data that supports the safety of ketamine administration for the treatment of postpartum depression (PPD) and other emotional disorders during breastfeeding. Women seeking ketamine therapy during the postpartum period will want to have a thorough conversation with their doctor, ketamine provider, and integration therapist to make sure ketamine infusions are right for them. At Aspen Ketamine Center, we recommend waiting a minimum of 12 hours after treatment to resume breastfeeding.


Aspen Ketamine Center also recommends optional private genetic testing specific to psychedelics to help the client and provider guide them on how they may respond to treatment based on their genetic markers. To learn more about genetic testing for psychedelic therapies, discover more here.

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